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13

Generally speaking serif fonts are considered easier to read in long bodies of text, even if there are no definitive studies about why they should be preferred over sans-serif fonts. Usually it is considered that serifs help the eye to go from a letter to another, creating something like a natural flow between words, but I personally think that this is a ...


11

Yes, custom fonts are easily added to any ereader of the Kobo family. An article on MobileRead fully explain how. Fonts can be be very easily added to the Kobo family of eReaders. With the Kobo attached to your computer, create a new directory called fonts in the root directory of the device (the same location as the .kobo, .adobe-digital-editions ...


9

I'm going to make the assumption that when you say more readable, you mean better comprehension and speed. Eric Michael Weisenmiller wrote his dissertation on A STUDY OF THE READABILITY OF ON-SCREEN TEXT (very lengthy and links directly to the PDF). It is a little dated (July, 1999) and does not focus on ebooks (at least as far as using ereader devices, ...


9

You can definitely embed fonts, yes. There are a few issues to watch out for when doing so, however: You may not have a license to use the font in ebooks. The font needs to be licensed in such a way as to not just allow use, but also distribution. There are a number of open source fonts available that do permit redistribution--make sure you read the license,...


8

The justification is normally specified in the CSS included in your ebook. Commercial ebooks often come 'justified', just like most traditional books (which generate less of a problem of large white space, through the combination of hyphenation and wider lines). It might be that the Kindle overrides the ebooks default, but I doubt it. What you should try ...


7

Yes, Kindle (classic) has no problem with displaying Cyrillic characters in PDFs. Here is the proof:


7

It is certainly possible to embed custom fonts and have them be used in iBooks, as well as on other EPUB reading systems. The process is known as embedding. Embedded fonts are simply included in the .zip archive that comprises the EPUB file, and then referenced properly in all the relevant content files. Places you will need to reference them include: CSS ...


6

Kobo ereaders are known for their font customization capabilities. They have a dozen of preinstalled fonts, and a couple of them aimed exactly to dyslexic readers. Besides selecting the font, you can also tweak it to your needs with many options for dimensions, spacing, margins, justification and thickness. You can read a couple of reviews, here and here, ...


5

I think that every device has its own behaviour, so I don't know if there is some setting that can be used as a general solution. In example, I have a Kobo ereader, and it is capable to do what you ask; if there is a custom font inside the ebook, and it is used only for titles or some paragraphs (i.e. to format code in computer science books), for the rest ...


5

I don't disagree with the above answer. I just wanted to say that on the Title/Credits HTML page (which contains copyright, date, etc) I included this line: The HomemadeApple Font embedded in this ebook is copyrighted 2010 by Font Diner, Inc. under a Apache 2.0 license. (and I linked to the license).


4

Well OK I somehow found the answer myself. The problem of Chinese fonts not updating is not because of my registration at US Amazon, but because of my system font not being Chinese. As soon as I changed my font to Chinese it almost immediately started the font update.


4

Besides a preference on the broad family of serif fonts over sans-serif ones (see my answer to your other font related question), I don't think that there is any set preference for a particular font type. Often books from the same publisher tend to have a set of shared fonts (once they have bought licenses for some font types, it is reasonable to broadly use ...


4

Every font contains the instructions to render all glyphs contained in them, so as long the software/device can use embedded fonts, you should expect every of them to work. I've checked it on my Kindle Classic. I've used the test I've made long time ago and described on my blog: Using dynamic fonts for international texts in iText. Both of the test PDF's ...


4

Getting older I started to have trouble reading, from my personal experience with a Sony PRS-700 (side lit), SONY PRS-T1 (no internal light) and Book Een Oddesey (front lit), I have to say that the lighting on the BookEen makes all of the differences being able to read comfortably. The BookEen also has a slightly higher resolution, at a similar screen size, ...


4

I would suggest going with an iPad with Retina Display not because: Its a bigger screen At the current time, better resolution than a few other devices BUT because Apple requires their typeset to be adjustable and coded in to accommodate for visually impaired and not a fixed font size. So what this means is if your dad buys a book on iTunes, he tries to ...


4

The problem can be mitigated slightly by using landscape rather than portrait mode on the hardware Kindle, and longer line settings in various Kindle apps. Higher average # of characters per line with these settings means two things. Lower number of line breaks per book, therefore lower expected number of awkward ones. Larger average number of spaces per ...


4

Kobo ereader devices My 1st gen Kobo Glo has the following fonts pre-installed (I suppose other Kobo devices use the same set; it is possible for the user to add more but I think this is beyond the scope of your question): Serif: (1) Amasis Caecilia Georgia (Default Serif font; also default font if nothing is specified in the ebook) Kobo Nickel Malabar ...


3

Size is more important than resolution for most visual impairments. As vision becomes more impaired, the ability to recognize detail is lost, and since text caries information in detail, larger sizes are used to compensate. Higher resolution adds detail, providing a better reading experience for those who can see it. One exception to this advice is people ...


3

If you are comfortable making HTML from your Word documents, I was able to print Hebrew text strings to Kindle KF8/Fire (phrases, not whole documents) using HTML with CSS tags. @font-face { font-family: 'Hebrew'; src: url('.../Path/HebrewFont.ttf'); } p.hb { font-family: 'Hebrew', serif; } In your HTML, you need to call the .hb class in your P ...


3

To extend on Tom's answer I have to disagree with how the media type is written for Truetype and I would also like to show how its written for Opentype. In the .opf file <manifest>: Truetype fonts <item id="Roboto_Regular" href="fonts/Roboto_Regular.ttf" media-type="application/x-font-ttf" /> media type for Truetype is: "application/x-font-...


3

I'd advise wrapping Hebrew-in-English in spans with the dir attribute set to rtl. I'd also advise following each span with the lrm element. See http://www.w3.org/International/articles/inline-bidi-markup/ As for fonts, pointed Hebrew support is now surprisingly good in the default fonts on a variety of platforms: Kindle Paperwhite, Kindle for Mac, Kindle ...


3

You can certainly specify custom fonts for Kindle books; that's what section 3.1.9 is all about. Section 3.1.1 is only talking about the things that it mentions: Forced alignment (because Amazon would rather force the ancient print relic of justified text throughout) Body text size Bold and italics on body text White or black color for body text White or ...


3

I think that embedding the font you want to use is your best option. Many fonts have a set of greek (and/or non latin) letters, so you should be safe by just typing the letters, and they should be correctly displayed regardless of the chosen font. But if, like you said, you want to include other special characters, embedding the full font could be the best ...


3

Increasing font size and spacing is a frequent problem for PDFs, especially for tablets that are 6 inch. PDFs are supposed to be printable documents, and so font size and other things tend to be fixed proportionate to the document size. Merely converting to .mobi will not solve this. If your original book were .epub, this is less likely to be a problem ...


3

Based on the sample you provided, you will not be able to change the font on that particular document. Here is why: As one commenter already suggested, it is very clear from the sample you provided that the text you are reading is a scanned image of the page and not text being rendered in realtime from a font. I work with scanned documents and OCR tools on ...


3

Recommending a specific font without actually seeing where it's going to be used is a lot like suggesting a wardrobe without knowing the person who will wear it. The purpose of a font is to make text readable. This is particularly true when there's a lot of text for the reader to process. Setting the text of a book in a fonts with potential for slowing ...


3

Here -- as best as I can tell -- are the system fonts for selected Android reading systems: Kindle for Android: Bookerly Caecilia Georgia Palatino Baskerville Helvetica (sans-serif) Lucida Droid Serif Open Dyslexic Note: Kindle/Android does NOT have an option for the user to select Publisher Defaults. Google Play Books: Original (?? -- does this ...


2

As a best practice, avoid font-size, margin or other css instructions when creating an ebook. An ebook is supposed to be just text and be made available to the device "as is". This allows the user to change the font family and size as he/she wishes. I know, being familiar with PDF or the layout with a webpage in the beginning the tendency is to translate ...


2

Unless your Kindle was previously jailbroken, you can't install new fonts. If it was, you'll have to re-install the font hack. have to read non-English book but kindle don't support it. Kindles with the 5.6.5 firmware support pretty much all languages without additional fonts. However, you must convert your books to the AZW3 format with Calibre, because ...


2

Some specific steps to take for Hebrew: Make sure your Hebrew is expressed with the proper Unicode characters (http://www.i18nguy.com/unicode/hebrew.html). If the Hebrew in your source document is just Latin characters with a special font applied, they won't show up right in the output. Embed a Hebrew font (a good openly licensed font is Ezra SIL: http://...


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