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On devices that use eInk, there are no subpixels like the Red, Green and Blue subpixels that can be separately addressed on color screens. Hence there is no subpixel rendering as such on eInk devices (as stated by Sriram Peruvemba (chief Marketing Officer at E-Ink Holdings). 3rd generation iPAD has subpixel rendering according to the same article, but it ...


8

The justification is normally specified in the CSS included in your ebook. Commercial ebooks often come 'justified', just like most traditional books (which generate less of a problem of large white space, through the combination of hyphenation and wider lines). It might be that the Kindle overrides the ebooks default, but I doubt it. What you should try ...


4

The problem can be mitigated slightly by using landscape rather than portrait mode on the hardware Kindle, and longer line settings in various Kindle apps. Higher average # of characters per line with these settings means two things. Lower number of line breaks per book, therefore lower expected number of awkward ones. Larger average number of spaces per ...


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Based on the sample you provided, you will not be able to change the font on that particular document. Here is why: As one commenter already suggested, it is very clear from the sample you provided that the text you are reading is a scanned image of the page and not text being rendered in realtime from a font. I work with scanned documents and OCR tools on ...


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There isn't much you can do, if the device allows to change the fonts and the user is willing to use that option, he will do it. If you use different fonts not just for aestethics, but with a functional purpose (i.e. to display code with a fixed width font, or to differentiate quotes from default paragraphs, and so on), your best option, IMHO, is to insert ...


2

Converting from PDFs is very difficult task and depends on vary of factors. The short answer is that sending it over Amazon with different parameters (subjects) wont help. Every PDF file can be saved in different ways. As Images(then you need OCR) or as text layers. If text layers it can be with different coding and sometimes that coding is not same as ...


2

Is there a good way that can easily get my kindle the ability to make reading malayalam ebooks possible on my kindle? Create an ePub file with Calibre and/or find an existing ePub file. Make sure that the source epub file is properly encoded. (I.e., if you open it with Calibre, it must show Malayalam characters.) If it does, simply convert it to an AZW3 ...


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I managed to solve this problem with help from mobileread forum. I am posting the link to answer here https://www.mobileread.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3849282&postcount=2


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"As a publisher, it drives me crazy that a reader would switch fonts because of a personal preference" If they prefer it in another style I'm not sure why that would bother you. It would bother me more if my customer found my work easier to digest in another font but couldn't change it. Why on earth would you make your book harder to read?


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First, though you can embed fonts in an epub/mobi file, there is no guarantee that the reading system will display the font correctly. I used an embedded font on my last ebook, and it did not render correctly on all devices (on kindle for example, it rendered on most systems, but not all). My guess is that more recent reading systems will support embedded ...


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Here are two help pages on this topic -- if you haven't found them already. https://superuser.com/questions/926340/how-to-change-efficiently-a-font-throughout-the-entire-pdf-document http://www.wikihow.com/Modify-Font-Properties-of-the-Text-in-a-PDF


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You can't generalise, because there are many e-book reader programs, and all of them work differently. In the Calibre e-book reader program, for instance, the user can design a personal stylesheet, which is an optional choice by the user. That is a user-customisable stylesheet which, if present, will over-ride all the css settings embedded in the e-book (in ...


1

ePub is just a whole bunch of HTML, some metadata, and CSS. So, you have the same rules as with any HTML page. You can't force any browser to display a page the way you want it. Your "fixed layout" is at best a suggestion. If you specify a typeface, and that typeface is not available on the client device, it will be ignored. You can ensure that the font is ...


1

<li> will not inherit from <p>, so what you are seeing is probably a different font in your lists than in your paragraphs. The easiest way I've found to test this is to add something impossible to mistake to the CSS for <p>. I like to use color: red, but your mileage may vary. Note that the reason that the fonts could appear to be ...


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Another possible option for books purchased from Amazon is to see if there's a newer version of the book that's using their newer KFX format, what I think they call enhanced typesetting. In that case the Kindle's font/layout options do allow you to switch between ragged right and fully justified. Otherwise your only option is to remove the drm which allows ...


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Everyone else just calls It anti-aliasing, and it can be used on both b/w and color displays with enough color depth. I wouldn't try it with less than 64 colors on b/w displays and 16bpp on color.


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