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48

Of course you can. The easiest method is save the whole site into a folder (e.g. mirror it with some command line tool like wget - it is available on Windows too - or Httrack) zip the folder send the zip to your device via Amazon e-mail solution. Here's the official Amazon page documenting this feature. If it's not what you want, you can use Calibre to ...


18

I prefer Calibre solution. Debian Calibre package come with ebook-convert utility. Grab HTML files from site by: $ wget -r -np -nc -k -c http://.../.../.. Locate your main HTML file (usually book.html or index.html) and convert to MOBI: $ cd dir-with-index $ ebook-convert index.html book.mobi $ ebook-convert index.html book.fb2 $ ebook-convert index.html ...


12

In general, formatting with HTML (though regarded as outdated by many, including W3C) tends to work more reliably than formatting with CSS. Support to CSS varies and can be disabled (though this is rare and mainly applies to web browsers). However, HTML formatting is very limited. You can use <i> for italic, <sup> for superscript, and a little ...


11

This is an indication of the quality of the ebook. (v5.0) should be close to retail quality: v1.x: publication has been scanned and OCR-ed, but not spell checked. v2.x: publication has been scanned, OCR-ed, and spell checked but not proofread. v3.x: publication has been scanned, OCR-ed, spell checked, and proofread. V4.x: publication has been proofread by ...


10

I had the exact same problem for a long time. You can produce good results with Calibre, but I found the process was a bit involved. Instead I created a way to do this much more easily. It's a browser extension called EpubPress (https://epub.press). All you do is: Open the webpages you want to save in different tabs. Open EpubPress Select all the pages ...


9

You can definitely embed fonts, yes. There are a few issues to watch out for when doing so, however: You may not have a license to use the font in ebooks. The font needs to be licensed in such a way as to not just allow use, but also distribution. There are a number of open source fonts available that do permit redistribution--make sure you read the license,...


8

Your best bet is to start with a solid epub file and run that through either KindleGen or Kindle Previewer. Other tools such as Sigil and Calibre are convenient, but often cause problems down the road by inserting their own bits of code. If you want to be certain that you know what is causing your problems, it's always best to do it yourself. The single ...


7

There are a few things going on here. The spacing issue is likely being caused by the presence of block elements inside list elements—the headers are probably getting bumped onto their own line, apart from the start of the list item. If you're starting with the toc.xhtml of an epub file, you'll need to lose any elements inside the Table of Contents ...


7

Paul Salvette wrote an ebook formatting guide which I recommend. He wrote boilerplate css which you can view/download here: http://bbebooksthailand.com/bb-CSS-boilerplate.html His company has produced some epub3 files which you can download for free. http://bbebooksthailand.com/samples.html (You can inspect them by changing the .epub file extension to .zip ...


5

I think that every device has its own behaviour, so I don't know if there is some setting that can be used as a general solution. In example, I have a Kobo ereader, and it is capable to do what you ask; if there is a custom font inside the ebook, and it is used only for titles or some paragraphs (i.e. to format code in computer science books), for the rest ...


5

One thought is the Sigil e-book-building software. It's available for Linux and I believe it would do what you need although there is some manual manipulation involved.


4

In principle a CDF could be embedded in an EPUB3 file, but it would not bring you much. You would need a reader that knows how to extract it and play it and those are currently not available. For viewing (playing?) a CDF you need to download and install software. This a problem for acceptance, a problem that Wolfram would have avoided if they could, e.g. by ...


4

For better compatibility, especially with older devices, you should stick with more basic HTML primitives. Those devices do not implement advanced browser functionality. The rendering engines in the ebook devices are lagging behind even more than desktop browsers as they need to be more stable (because upgrading is mostly out of the question). So recon you ...


4

You can use the following CSS rules to style respectively even or odd table rows (See the Example on W3schools): tr:nth-child(even) { background-color: #f2f2f2 } tr:nth-child(odd) { background-color: #f2f2f2 }


3

You can try to suppress both those tags using CSS in an included .css file (or inserting in the HTML code between <style> and </style>): span.titlemark, span.titlemark + br { display: none; } But you would have to test that on all devices to see if their renderers correctly handle it.¹ If you don't want to go into the effort of testing ...


3

If you have an html editor which supports wild card or RegEx search and replace like Adobe Dreamweaver you could delete these out of the source code very quickly. See image below- Also you can go to RegEx tester sites like these to form the most effective search expression for your needs. http://regex101.com/


3

The best practice is to store your .js script in a folder labelled JavaScript inside the .oebps folder, then have your HTML point to that script / directory whenever you need to employ it. I have to confess though that I did not understand most if your question with the 'tiny boxes' and such.


3

The problem with trying any really interesting design elements (like responsiveness) in ebooks is that the main reading systems out there are amazingly primitive by web standards. JavaScript support is more or less confined to iBooks at present, and the only system that uses media queries that I know of is Kindle, and they only support the amzn-mobi and amzn-...


3

Kobo ereader devices have two different internal reading software. Ebooks downloaded from the Kobo bookstore are a modified epub format with the particular extension .kepub.epub, while if you sideload a standard epub from your PC it retains its original extension (.epub). By checking the extension of the files, the software automatically select the ...


3

The following regex should cover most cases. Find: ([[:lower:]],*;*:*)</p>\s+<p[^>]*>\s*([[:lower:]]) Replace: \1 \2


3

Pandoc is your friend here. Pandoc can take your input file (LaTeX, markdown, other) and transform it to PDF, EPUB, HTML (and many more). Pandoc is cross-platform and free under the GPL, although donations are appreciated. With regards to formatting your code, both LaTeX and markdown have components that will help. LaTeX has many more layout options. ...


3

According to this blog article, you should use the display: inline-block property on a div selector that encloses your header and paragraph. Here is an excerpt from the said article: If you set the display property for a div to be inline-block, iBooks will display the contents of the entire div together on a single page, skipping to a new page if ...


3

I would use h4 {page-break-after: avoid;} p { widows: 2; orphans: 2; } I think this works for Kindles as well as epubs. This is just example code. My guess is that this is structured content you would want to use a special class for the paragraphs below the h4. I would not be surprised if the Kindle e-ink devices do not support this css property ...


2

Testing this it seems that this is simply a quirk of Calibre's ebook viewer. It adds the absolute calculated size of the image dynamically into the source. This size changes when you resize the window (with the inspector window open it shows continuously). Whether max-width and max-height styles are set by the viewer depends on the viewing mode. In page mode ...


2

You can use the GrabMyBooks Firefox extension. It can grab single web-pages and convert them to epub, or adding multiple pages as distinct chapters. There is also a Calibre plugin called FanFictionDownloader, but I've never used it.


2

I went nuts figuring this out. Developed mile long Xpath strings and what not. Then it turned out to be ridiculously simple. I am ignoring op systems in this answer... (a) for the conversion to epub use Calibre. It imports as a zip file. No need to make a zip file beforehand. Then you convert the zip to ebook in Calibre. (b) spider the web site: Cyotek ...


2

In addition to the resources Tom listed, Joshua Tallent's book Kindle Formatting will give you tips for working around formatting problems. It's an old book and doesn't cover Kindle Format 8, but if you run into issues, it might give you ideas to try. Fortunately, KF8 has fewer limitations than MOBI 7, the older Kindle format, but the book will help if you ...


2

You actually want to build HTML5-based standalone desktop apps. You should try: App.js (http://appjs.com/) Tide SDK (http://www.tidesdk.org/) Node webkit (https://github.com/rogerwang/node-webkit) I don't know how well they play together with JQuery, or with already written eBooks, but you can make a try. Actually many times the point with this packages ...


2

If you don't want the hassle of setting up the full LaTeX stack, as needed with the, in this respect, unfriendly pandoc, you can have a look at reStructured text and Sphinx. For these tools exists to generate ePub and PDF, the latter without having to go through LaTeX.


2

I say this as something who doesn't normally use the product, but Adobe InDesign allows for an easy export into PDF and epub. I don't know about formatting code blocks though. Adobe ID has a monthly subscription, so even though it's a premium product, in many cases you're only using it for one or two months. You might be able to buy some low cost Adobe ID ...


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