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49

It is possible, but will need prior processing for optimal results. You can use the free tool k2pdfopt to optimize PDFs for your reader's display size. It can handle up to four columns, works with "normal" (using actual stings in the PDF) as well as scanned text and will turn your input PDF into a PDF with more pages optimized for your screen's size. Newer ...


31

You can use the converter that Amazon gives you. Every Kindle device and Kindle app is associated with an email box (like firstname_abc123@kindle.com) and you may allow specific email accounts to send messages with attachments to it. If you send an email to your Kindle email account and attach a document (.mobi, .doc, .docx, .ppt, .pptx, .xls, .xlsx) it ...


20

You can upload your PDF to Google Drive, convert it to Google Docs (open with Docs), and apply tool Translate to... English. It will make a copy of the PDF in editable format and also keep the original. Visit drive.google.com, sign into it with your username and password Click on NEW > File Upload, select the file from your computer.. After uploading the ...


18

It depends on the style of PDF and the kind of Kindle you have. I have an older Kindle DX and I read two-column PDFs on it from time to time. In the end, I find it a bit difficult to read. The reason is that I must read the top half of one column, then go to the next page to read the bottom half, then jump back to the previous page to read the top half of ...


16

Since I find scrolling and zooming on an ebook cumbersome, what I would do with a large image/map is divide it in smaller pieces, slightly smaller than my screen resolution (30 or so pixel less -> 15 on each side). After that generate separate HTML pages, for each image part, and put in hyper-links from page to page on the sides (alternatively I would ...


14

Yes, you certainly can. The concerns about page size are correct, in normal mode the PDFs will be hard to read. But when you set landscape mode (menu -> screen rotation) they are quite comfortable to read. Proof (wikipedia site converted to PDF):


13

Well, you could always buy a copy of Adobe Acrobat, which is actually designed solely for the purpose of creating and editing PDF files. Or you could import the file into Calibre, convert it to ePub format, edit the ePub to add the table of contents, then convert it back to PDF. There are other free tools for working with PDF directly. If you do a Google ...


13

The size of a PDF file is dependent on the content of that file. A PDF file is a bundle of streams, with mostly compressed data. If you generate a PDF file from e.g. a Word or OpenOffice document, these file tend to be relatively small, especially if you do not include Font information and rely on the system provided fonts or font substitutions. Adding ...


11

Interesting question. I'm sure a LOT of folks have the same issue. PDFs are what are known as non-reflowable formats. That is the text is printed at certain xy coordinates on the paper (gross simplification). When PDF was designed they never envisioned screen size to shrink to that of an iPhone. Hence the need to zoom/pan when reading PDFs. You just can't ...


11

The device that you need is basically an e-ink ereader, all of them have the features that you have requested. Since there are many different brands and models, each one with its own set of different features, I suggest you to take a look at the comparison page on Wikipedia, that has in one place all the informations that you need to make your choice; if ...


10

This would be extremely difficult since the broad range of devices out there have vastly different physical screen sizes and aspect ratios. Your best bet would be to use a small page size (perhaps 4" x 3") so that users with e-book apps on their smartphones would still be able to comfortably read the text. This comes at a price: e-book readers or tables with ...


10

Just like buying a hardcover version doesn't let you also take a paperback from the store, no, having a print version does not entitle you to a complimentary ebook version, though some publishers will offer that when you buy from their websites.


9

I find it too bothersome to read most PDF's on a Kindle: there's nothing worse than electronic text that's immutable and illegible. The only satisfactory thing I have found is to export the text in a tagged format or in html (I have an old copy of Adobe Acrobat Pro), style it with CSS and then create a new Kindle-sized PDF (usually from a browser).


9

As can be seen from the wide variety of answers, reading PDFs on Kindles is cumbersome at best. There are 2 reasons for this: PDFs are formatted for a fixed width and height that usually exceeds the resolution of E-ink Kindle devices, including the Kindle DX. E-ink readers work best when used with E-ink optimized fonts, which are generally not used in PDFs. ...


9

You should consider converting these to EPUB files instead of PDF. My experience with Sony is that the EPUB files are handled much better (and faster). You can use Calibre to convert DOCX, ODT and RTF formats directly, if you have the files in some other format you can use LibreOffice to convert them first to DOCX (make sure you have an up-to-date version ...


8

There was a relevant question asked on Slashdot today - someone asked for an e-ink-reader for academic papers. The OP is asking specifically about PDF's on a Kindle, but in the comments of the Slashdot discussion I found someone who posted about a utility they wrote that could help in this situation. I wrote a small script that takes research papers and ...


8

The "problem" is that PDF does not know anything about its contents and the structure of the document (unless structure has been added — maybe in order to make it accessible). That means that you will have to find other ways to recognize (in the case of a TOC) titles etc. One possibility (and I think PDFpen is doing it that way) is enumerating all text ...


7

PDF is a format that contains many ways to get something displayed on your screen. Some of them allow for better conversions and should be very readable on a Kindle after conversion (some ebook-readers allow for re-wrapping of PDF data, I have not read yet that any Kindle can do that). Other PDF files are composed of images of pages. Most often consisting ...


7

Yes, Kindle (classic) has no problem with displaying Cyrillic characters in PDFs. Here is the proof:


7

I have used jPdfBookmarks on both Windows and Linux to do exactly what you describe - create your own bookmarks. Find it here.


7

I will extend on @Donald's answer but I would also like to note I do not recommend, personally for quality issues, ever using Calibre for ebook development. As stated I would suggest getting a copy of Acrobat and you can (for this example I am using Acrobat X Standard but note the I have not seen any difference in the shortcut buttons BUT the GUI has ...


7

Create a watermark pdf which contains the footer using imagemagick: convert -background none -geometry +0+0 -fill \#000000 -pointsize 12 label:"From the library of..." -set label '' -page A4 watermark.pdf It creates a simple pdf ( size: A4 ) with the text From the library of... at the bottom left corner. You might change the font, the position of the text, ...


7

That would depend on the publisher. They are not required to provide an electronic version of the book but some do it to help sell the title. Usually you can check the copyright page in some and will have the last page at the end of the book that tells you it is included. What you are asking is a selling feature of the book and some publishers even go ...


6

As Nathan Yegler already blogged: “it’s more fun to write programs to help you write slides than it is to write slides.”. There is a plethora of programs out there that allow you to make slides in many forms and there are books on the subject as well¹. From personal experience I can recommend starting with a structured mark-up based format for editing that ...


6

Some eBook reader apps are able to translate for you on the fly (I know of two, Google Books and Cool Reader. A better list is in Wikipedia features table). Please note that this translation isn't guaranteed to be very good, and language support differs between readers as well.


6

I don't know if this is exact enough, but based on a combination of my own manual measurements and specifications listed in the user guide (warning links to pdf directly): Screen resolution is 600(w) x 800(h) pixels Screen measurements (approx, done myself) are 92(w) x 122(h) mm Using this calculator, that gives us a dpi of approx 44. Approx measurement of ...


6

Setting the title of the PDF: File menu / Properties / Description tab, Title field. Setting the author: Tools menu / Options / LibreOffice / User Data tab, fill the First name and Last name fields, File menu / Properties / General tab, tick the Apply user data checkbox, press the Reset button (it's near to the Apply user data checkbox). The Reset button ...


6

pdftk, the PDF toolkit, is a program that has been around since 2004, and is available for multiple platforms: Windows, Linux, OSX. Although you could probably compile (it is open source) and run it on some (Android based) ebook readers, it is more intended to be run on your main computer, to change files before loading them onto your ebook reader. pdftk ...


6

It sounds like the pages you've looked at are telling you the right thing. If you have an image-based PDF, then there is no text in it, just pictures of text. In order to convert the pictures of text to actual text, you have two options: have a human do the conversion, or have the computer do the conversion. Having a human do it would mean someone sitting ...


6

Kindle - but also the other ebook readers - have a small screen: since a PDF is not a liquid format, either you'll end up with tiny characters or you'll have to move the virtual page on the physical screen. In my opinion, a larger tablet in such cases is much better.


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