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20

The answer is yes. You can use John MacFarlane's Pandoc to directly generate EPUB 2 or EPUB 3 from markdown.


20

Leanpub.com accepts Markdown only from authors. They use some extensions like tables or source code embedding to take most of the pain away. Markdown doesn’t offer such a fine control like TeX/LaTeX, but most ebook readers wouldn’t honor that anyway. You can take a look at the free samples (example) to judge the result. I think, yes, Markdown is an ...


13

Yes, I think it may be used and, in my opinion, it makes it easier to layout and format the whole text. There are tools that allow you to type using Markdown and do export to epub and mobi formats among others. One example of such tools is Draft UPDATE: I have recently edited and published a book using Markdown and the gitbook project. It worked perfectly....


5

Markdown does not seem to have many formatting options, but it looks like it is being used for creating ebooks, since there seem to be many books about creating ebooks from markdown from a google search. An example blog: http://ianhocking.com/2013/06/22/writing-a-novel-using-markdown/


4

Ed, the answer more depends on your purpose. The literal answer is Scrivener does indeed create valid e-books and is well maintained. I've used Scrivener for Mac for years. I've occasionally compiled the document to kindle format to carry around. That process works just fine. If your real purpose is to Write the Great Novel or some other large and complex ...


3

Markdown is fine for most common textual purposes, but if you are creating complex material, or material which you want to re-use for other purposes, you might want to look at one of the many XML formats. Both DocBook and TEI are in extensive use in publishing for complex work, but at the moment you still need to learn how XML works in order to use an XML ...


3

Pandoc is your friend here. Pandoc can take your input file (LaTeX, markdown, other) and transform it to PDF, EPUB, HTML (and many more). Pandoc is cross-platform and free under the GPL, although donations are appreciated. With regards to formatting your code, both LaTeX and markdown have components that will help. LaTeX has many more layout options. ...


3

I have heard of 2epub but I have never used it nor would I believe you would get a good quality ebook. I would suggest doing this with InDesign that will allow you to create .epub or .pdf files. You can export as an .epub file: Export to .pdf file:


3

Markdown is an excellent shortcut to HTML, especially for non-technical writers and editors. Some publishing services (Leanpub, Gitbook, PenFlip and others) make the most of this. The drawback with most markdown-based publishing services currently is that they use flavours of markdown that don't support classes (technically, 'attribute definitions' for ...


2

I have used Markdown to create content, then used Pandoc to convert that content into ePub format for reading on iBooks. Markdown does not have a lot of layout features compared to LaTeX. If you want something fast and quick for images, simple tables and text, Markdown will work great. If your intent is to have finer layout control, with drop caps and ...


2

Google Drive has live collaboration and is totally in the cloud. It can export PDF files and HTML files that can be easily converted to ePub. This may also be possible with Microsoft Skydrive, but I am unfamiliar with that suite.


2

I say this as something who doesn't normally use the product, but Adobe InDesign allows for an easy export into PDF and epub. I don't know about formatting code blocks though. Adobe ID has a monthly subscription, so even though it's a premium product, in many cases you're only using it for one or two months. You might be able to buy some low cost Adobe ID ...


2

If you don't want the hassle of setting up the full LaTeX stack, as needed with the, in this respect, unfriendly pandoc, you can have a look at reStructured text and Sphinx. For these tools exists to generate ePub and PDF, the latter without having to go through LaTeX.


1

Some time ago I created a GitHub repository of eBook Writing Resources. Specifically, this is the current list (as of the time of writing this answer - visit the link above for an up-to-date list as well as to get visual indications on whether they cost money, work offline or on the cloud etc.) of eBook writing software. Specifically, GitBook and Scrivener ...


1

You can use Papyrus (http://papyruseditor.com) to create books in PDF, Epub and Mobi(Kindle) formats. Disclosure : I am the creator of this site.


1

I am a founder at memobuild, an online book/document editor with collaborative features and export to ePUB and PDF. It's oriented toward technical writing, so if you're writing a novel it's probably best to use something else. But for technical books, reports, manuals, etc... it's a great fit. Note: We're currently in closed beta, but if you register I'll ...


1

(While the original question is older, my answer is relevant to show that Markdown continues to have value in more cases than you think, even as Markdown evolves.) Yes. I've converted several PDFs into text, then Markdown, and then into an EPUB. Markdown is not as "cluttery" as say, raw HTML, so it's easier to read. And it's easier for beginners to learn ...


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