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You can upload your PDF to Google Drive, convert it to Google Docs (open with Docs), and apply tool Translate to... English. It will make a copy of the PDF in editable format and also keep the original. Visit drive.google.com, sign into it with your username and password Click on NEW > File Upload, select the file from your computer.. After uploading the ...


8

I recommend you consider to move to an explicit mark-up system (LaTeX, reST/Sphinx) that allow you to: split the work in smaller files that are automatically combined use revision control (Mercurial) on the files so you can see what changed between versions (roll-back of changes, easy differencing, have multiple people work on the same file with conflict ...


6

Some eBook reader apps are able to translate for you on the fly (I know of two, Google Books and Cool Reader. A better list is in Wikipedia features table). Please note that this translation isn't guaranteed to be very good, and language support differs between readers as well.


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If you're using MS Word, use the change tracking features ("review" button on the ribbon in MSOffice 2007 => "Track changes"). This way, you know what changes you made on what pages since the last translation pass. Once you apply all those changes to the translation, you accept them (which folds them into main document and leaves the change list empty ...


3

If you need a professional quality level translation, (as you seem to imply when you mark the book as important), I think that your only option is to hire someone who has knowledge of both languages that can do the work for you. By using any online or computerized service you can't have any guarantee about the quality of the translation.


2

A similar approach to the one proposed by Anthon - to use Latex - is to try a much simpler, relatively basic way of editing the text where you also markup (similar to how we edit these questions and answers). One of the well used formats is called markdown. Here's a blog post by an author who switched to using markdown instead of Word or other document ...


1

You might try using a two-column per page method for translation, where column A has your source text and column B has your target text. With this method the source and target paragraphs can easily be spaced so that the first line of each of the source-target paragraphs are in perfect alignment with each other. I've been using this method to do a bi-...


1

The translations present in Wikisource are under a CC-BY-SA license, which means that you may freely use them in a book you make, provided you let people do the same with your derivative work. (The translations themselves were possible because the works of Mark Twain are in the public domain) In practice, you should put in the colophon something like "Text ...


1

Practically speaking, the answer is that wikisource's texts have terms similar (and possibly identical) to the public domain, although it is not always identical to public domain. Sourcetext on wikisource is creative commons attribution share alike (BY-SA), https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ ( https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/...


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First, the work on wikisource is labeled BY-SA. So essentially you are not required to list the translator if republishing. It is surprising not to have a translator listed. One method may be to try to locate the actual translation to an actual edition. On Google Books, for example, you can browse here. https://www.google.com/webhp?hl=en&sa=X&ved=...


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There are three ways you can do this: You can use Google translate You won’t be doing this directly. First, you need to copy the text from the PDF file and paste it on the google translate. Once translated, transfer the new converted text to a word document file. For PDF format preference: Convert the document file to PDF by clicking File, go to Save as, ...


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