32

Virtually all e-book readers can display PDF files. Unfortunately, PDF documents are "pre-rendered" - the text is positioned on the page in absolute coordinates and text cannot reflow on smaller / larger devices (without hacks or trickery that rarely work well). TXT files are a good option if formatting isn't a concern. Most e-book readers can display TXT ...


11

The short answer, no. Kindle uses what is called a My Clippings.txt file using standard text formatted in a particular way. Here is an example that was taken from this readme file on a GitHub project (modified slightly to remove leading comment characters). 97_Things_Every_Programmer_Should_Know - Highlight Loc. 250-51 | Added on Wednesday, December 29,...


10

As Donald points out in his answer, (new) devices would have to support SVG 'images' as support for SVG is specified in the EPUB 3.0 standard. For line drawings, but also for zoomable images (maps come to mind), this is a vastly superior format over any pixel based file format. How soon that adaptation will happen will be influenced by how easy it is to ...


8

The ePub 3.0 standard specifically names SVG as one of the core media types to be supported. The 2.0 standard also names SVG as one of the supported types in the img tag documentation. So any device supporting ePub would have to be able to handle an SVG image, which is the vast majority.


8

Apart from the consideration what format the most people have, you should consider your wish to control over the layout of the text and how well the format can be converted to other formats by your readers. Some formats like TXT allow very little control over the layout. In PDF you have much control over the layout, as you have in EPUB and MOBI. ...


7

You essentially already answer your own question: indexes are more than just a reference to the words in a text. Apart from creating relationships an index can hide non-essential use of a word, and have definitions be different from normal use of a word. This requires interpretation by the author, something a search does not do. I used LaTeX and its index ...


5

The short answer is no, and I don't expect there to be anything like that with a single recommendation. The reason is that different input material is better rendered in different image file formats. All material handles well in non-lossy formats (among others most of the TIFF formats, PNG), however such format produce large files. When you look at space ...


5

It's great to hear about a project where the audio would actually add substantively to the content of the book--that's too often not the case. In your case, I'd say yes, it does definitely make sense to add the audio, as it is directly relevant and helpful to understanding the subject. It is also perfectly allowable in the epub 3.0 specification, though ...


4

http://epubtest.org/ is very current and provides stats on overall eReader support as well as support for individual ePub 3 features. It would appear this site is updated regularly and is likely to continue to be current.


3

Most people here are focusing on the device side of the question, but there's another one that may be equally important: the economic side. This depends on what your goal with your book is—are you planning to sell it, or do you just want to distribute it so that lots of people can read it? If the latter, then yes, text files or PDF are reasonable options (...


3

EPUB 3.0 has support for Media Overlays, which allows you to synchronize text and audio. My first Ebook reader had audio support, but my newest (bought 5+ years later) doesn't. It is not a feature that plays a part in selecting a device which is primarily for reading. Although there might be some novelty in having sound snippets in a particular book, in ...


3

The EPUB 3 standard clearly specifies audio capability: EPUB 3 supports audio and video embedded in [content documents] via the new [HTML5] audio and video elements, inheriting all the functionality and features these elements provide. (For information on supported audio formats, please refer to Core Media Types [Publications30]. For recommendations on ...


3

The 2014.1 version of the "Amazon Kindle Publishing Guidelines" indicates support for many SVG elements -- including -- see page 26. I'm not entirely sure whether the svg can include embedded bitmaps though. Also, http://epubtest.org/compare/ has some entries for device support by svg feature. Significantly I note that Kindle data has not been filled in, ...


2

There is no one reader that works across platforms. For a large and fully-loaded ePub3 ebook, the following readers will work pretty well. No reader is perfect, but these ones have minimal issues. MacOS X: iBooks, Adobe Digital Editions, Readium (in Chrome browser, but only with unzipped epub3 files) iOS: iBooks, Adobe Digital Editions Windows: Adobe ...


2

This article from 2013 says: for some reason, SVG image support in modern products is still a kind of an afterthought, and it shows. The EPUB standards authors were nice enough to include support for these files in the EPUB standards, which is great in principle, yet they included content negotiation mechanisms so that SVG support is still technically ...


2

Yes! Indexes are useful because they can contain entries pointing the reader to a page which discusses a topic without actually mentioning the topic's word. E.G. A biography might talk about a person's difficult relationship with his wife. The book pages may say words like "relationship came under strain" and mention "Annie" repeatedly, but the index can ...


1

To do this, you will need to use Sections. Also, when you create a new section, make sure to disable the "Link to Previous" option so that the formatting starts where you want it to. Make sure your opening content is in one section, then start your first chapter in a second section. Add a footer to the first page of the chapter and insert your page number ...


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