32

Virtually all e-book readers can display PDF files. Unfortunately, PDF documents are "pre-rendered" - the text is positioned on the page in absolute coordinates and text cannot reflow on smaller / larger devices (without hacks or trickery that rarely work well). TXT files are a good option if formatting isn't a concern. Most e-book readers can display TXT ...


19

Here's an epub 3.0 file that validates with epubcheck 3.0.1 (the current version at the time of writing). There's plenty more info that can (and should) go in there, of course, but you asked for minimums. We'll start with file structure: in the root directory, there's one mimetype file and two folders--the OEBPS and the META-INF. Here's the mimetype file ...


8

You can certainly use standard <a> tags with matching ids to create hyperlinks within an epub file, yes. The structure of the text could look like: <p class="body">Here is a bunch of text with a footnote <a epub:type="noteref" href="notes.xhtml#note1" class="reference" id="ref1">[1]</a></p> With a matching note in a notes....


8

Apart from the consideration what format the most people have, you should consider your wish to control over the layout of the text and how well the format can be converted to other formats by your readers. Some formats like TXT allow very little control over the layout. In PDF you have much control over the layout, as you have in EPUB and MOBI. ...


7

It is certainly possible to embed custom fonts and have them be used in iBooks, as well as on other EPUB reading systems. The process is known as embedding. Embedded fonts are simply included in the .zip archive that comprises the EPUB file, and then referenced properly in all the relevant content files. Places you will need to reference them include: CSS ...


7

Images in general should be added just as they would be in HTML, with an <img> tag. The image files themselves should then be included in the OEBPS folder or a subfolder (I generally use a subfolder, personally). Each image file will need to be declared in the <manifest> section of the content.opf file. As mentioned in the epub 3.0 specifications,...


5

In regards to my comments about Tom's ePub not validating there is an error in his toc.xhtml on line 13 and should be coded as <li><a href="1_hello.xhtml">Hello</a></li> which will produce the error message from IDPF validator as: In regards to the version 3.0 ePub I disagree and believe it should be noted that when an ePub is built ...


3

To extend on Tom's answer I have to disagree with how the media type is written for Truetype and I would also like to show how its written for Opentype. In the .opf file <manifest>: Truetype fonts <item id="Roboto_Regular" href="fonts/Roboto_Regular.ttf" media-type="application/x-font-ttf" /> media type for Truetype is: "application/x-font-...


3

Most people here are focusing on the device side of the question, but there's another one that may be equally important: the economic side. This depends on what your goal with your book is—are you planning to sell it, or do you just want to distribute it so that lots of people can read it? If the latter, then yes, text files or PDF are reasonable options (...


3

By itself I don't think book trailers accomplish very much; they have to be coordinated with other publicity/marketing methods. On the other hand, Amazon and Smashwords allow book trailers (with Amazon, you have to create an account on Author Central). So it gives potential readers a different kind of medium which can justify the purchase decision. I have ...


2

It really depends on the type of content you are producing and how many sections there are (and what they are about). I've heard lots of readers just give a longer pause between sections, and that worked well. On the other hand, flashbacks are already a unique beast and we are already accustomed to hearing or seeing some kind of cue. The standard I'd use ...


2

I suggest you use Sigil, or another ebook creator software. Don't start from scratch with an .html file, it's more complicated, start from scratch with a sofware. I can list the things that you can have with that kind of sofwares that you'll have automatically, and that you couldn't have with a non specialised software. And be careful if you use a word ...


1

Hi LaserYeti and welcome to the forum! I personally don't agree with the usage of video for advertising a book. I think it is more logical to use the same type of media to advertise your product: Movies advertise with trailers and book advertise with written text like samples. For example making a website that promotes your work is not a bad idea! Also, ...


1

If you plan on advertising or promoting your book on Facebook and some other platforms, you will usually get a bigger reach with video than with an ad featuring a still photo, so that's one reason in favor.


1

I admit I am not into videos at all (ok, I made a video interview for the first book I wrote, but it was more fun than other), but I believe that having a chapter freely available should be a better publicity for the book. Of course, your mileage may vary: if you are good and brilliant in producing videos, and you like it, probably it will help sales.


1

Yes, you can use internal links in ePub files. Depending on which tool you use to generate your ePubs (I prefer Sigil), you can develop the individual internal files using HTML directly. So you can create a link with an <a href=""> tag just as you would in a webpage. This is often used in creating custom tables of contents, or links to footnotes. To ...


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