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26

Tesseract is an open source OCR engine that gives fairly good results. It's my understanding that Google use it for Google Books. OCRFeeder is a project for document layout analysis that works as a nice GUI for Tesseract. Ocropus is another known open source OCR system.


10

Just like buying a hardcover version doesn't let you also take a paperback from the store, no, having a print version does not entitle you to a complimentary ebook version, though some publishers will offer that when you buy from their websites.


10

ABBY Finereader to a text file proofread text file against images use NoteTab Pro to HTMLize the text create ePub structure in Oxygen, cut and paste HTML into ePub files view with Calibre and Adobe Digital Editions check with ePub Validator (http://validator.idpf.org/) If you don't proofread, you're going to get scannos (equivalent of a typo, resulting from ...


10

For commercial software you could try ABBYY FineReader or alternatives, or Omnipage or alternatives. Both can output in Searchable PDF format, which is useful because if you use OCR on books you will never get 100% the right content without proofreading.


9

Scan Tailor is software that helps optimize the images resulted from scan of books and it is free. Its features include: Fix orientation Split pages (very useful when you scan two pages at once and want to make a single page view ebook) Deskew Select content (can be used to remove the pagination and any other content that do not make sense in flowable ...


7

That would depend on the publisher. They are not required to provide an electronic version of the book but some do it to help sell the title. Usually you can check the copyright page in some and will have the last page at the end of the book that tells you it is included. What you are asking is a selling feature of the book and some publishers even go ...


7

The point of failure in all these toolchains is the OCR. It is well worth the time spent tracking down clean, undamaged, unfaded, non-yellowed copies with a good-quality print impression, if this is at all possible. If you can, get a local craft bookbinder to trim the spine off the book with a power guillotine, and then use an autofeed scanner on the ...


6

Scanned texts are most efficiently stored in the DJVU format, if lossy compression is acceptable (if not, use a multi-page format like TIFF). If you convert scans to the DJVU format with OCR recognition enabled, you can extract the OCR-ed text and use if for EPUB generation. On Linux you can do so using djvutxt to get the text and convert that to EPUB. A ...


5

If you want to digitize it yourself, you absolutely can under the First Sale Doctrine, provided that you own the copy of the books. I digitize books, so this actually wouldn't be daunting. At this point, however, I haven't started digitizing personal books yet. Yet. I use free, open source tools to process ebooks from digitized books: Homer (sorts pages and ...


5

Here is a project that handles every step of the process. There is an open source project called Homer that installs a suite of software to help with this including ScanTailor and tesseract-ocr. The final result is a searchable PDF. You can copy the text layer from the pdf (or the related html file created in the process) and paste it into an editor like ...


3

You need to be careful in assuming that this book is "freely available". You mention that it is part of a lecture series, which leads me to believe that it was at one time used as materials to be handed out during that lecture series. As such, there is a really good chance that the author will retain full copyright privileges. Keep in mind that even if the ...


3

If the book is explicitly free, then you can print the book and use it for your your own purposes. Please note however that the owner to the book's rights has to say so (author, publisher), not just anybody who only put it up on the internet. Be sure to provide evidence to the print service provider up front, that you have the right to print this book, as ...


3

This would depend on the publisher, and as you mention, it's difficult to prove that you bought the book unless you bought it directly from the publisher and they have a record of it. Many publishers will offer discounts if you're buying both the ebook version and the print version, so it doesn't hurt to ask if you've bought directly from a publisher, but if ...


2

An e-book is basically made of 2 things, that both have copyrights associated: The content of the book The edition of the book The former is the work of the author to write the text. The latter is the work of the editor to turn the text into a presentable file. A paper book is the same thing, plus a physical support, which have an intrinsic value due to ...


2

I don't think there is any reference style suitable for both print and ebook. Certainly footnotes look better in printed books, though I think EndNotes would be a better compromise solution for both medias. One problem with ebooks is that the semantics can be different when you are trying to come up with something resembling footnotes. In epub3 there is ...


2

The first point is that freely available does not mean freely usable, not even freely redistributable. Many copyrighted works are freely available, even placed under a Creative common licence, but still have legal restriction on their uses, regarding for example modification or commercial use. The fact that it is, or is not available in print or some other ...


1

Download a PDF of the book and take it to Kinko's (in the US) which will print one-off books for you. Office stores like Office Max also have low-volume printing services there too. Professional printing companies will generally charge you a lot more because there is a lot more setup involved with their machines. One type of soft cover book in the US is ...


1

You can print the file easily with lulu.com as a printed book. I believe they have a manufacturing facility in the U.S. and the U.K. and can ship globally. The fact that your pdf is an image file makes no difference. Keep in mind that if your book is in manuscript format you will have to do a bit of tweaking if you want it printed in common stock book sizes. ...


1

This is a shopping/recommendation question, which is generally not appropriate for this site. I have to assume that you want the printed book for personal use and not to sell to other people. I also have to assume that you don't care about how the cover looks and that you want something bound. But you didn't mention how many copies you want or how much you ...


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