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5

There are two possibilities here, and without seeing more of the book's code, it's not really possible to tell. The first is that this is extra functionality offered by the reading system rather than something built into the epub file itself. As noted by Liz Castro in the spec, this is similar to Apple's example of supporting symantically marked footnotes,...


3

First, I don't think footnotes translate easily to HTML. Endnotes are way easier and more appropriate. The problem here is that HTML isn't semantically rich enough to do these things automatically. You need to manually do the numbering. I use docbook XML to create citations and endnotes. Very easy to do. Then I use docbook XSLT to output everything in ...


3

Remember that you are trying to apply the expectations for a print book onto an ebook. That may be a mistake. You don't need to re-create everything; you just want something that approximates what you want. A simple hyperlink to an End Notes section at the end of the book would satisfy the functional need even if it's not the same thing. Fast and easy to ...


2

Footnotes are tricky. My general practice is to do as you have suggested, and put them at the end of the chapter—this seems to be the best general purpose solution. If you are targeting specific reading systems/devices, you can get more fancy: on the iPad, for example, you can use pop-up footnotes, as detailed in the answers to this question. Another ...


1

I'm somewhat mystified that the reading system would put the footnote on the next line. Are you sure that in the HTML source there is no random space (or extra character) between the last word of the sentence, the period, and the number reference in brackets? One might expect these characters to run after another without spaces regardless of which line it ...


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