6

Collection download and transfer Ability to synchronize your collection between multiple devices Ability to synchronize your collection with the cloud As a subset of this, backing up and restoring your collection in the cloud Ability to manually download books from your PC collection to mobile device without automated syncing Ability to connect to eBook ...


6

To add to already good answers: NOTEs: "[Phone]" marks features that have more impact and usefulness on a smartphone and may be less important on a tablet. I won't delve into content management/library organization features (e.g. dealing with multiple books), as that warrants its own Q&A in my opinion, and was also mentioned as a bullet in Jason Down'...


4

The Paperwhite uses a Carta e-ink screen with a contrast ratio of 15:1 however, here's a German test that says the contrast actually is 12:1 (assuming Google translate was accurate -- my German is horrible). It has comparisons with other models, too. The Kobo Glo uses a Pearl screen with a contrast radio of 10:1 Here is an older comparison of the two ...


4

Although reading books is often properly implemented even on older ebook readers (including bookmarks), selecting a book from those available on the device is often a cumbersome affair. This gives the impression that some ebook device developers only tried the device with a handful of books instead with a more realistic number of a few thousand books. An ...


4

It's hard to tell exactly what is going wrong without being able to at least poke around inside the files you're having problems with, unfortunately. Just as not all ebook readers are created equal, not all ebook files are created equal. Images not showing up could be conversion errors as much as they could be problems with your device. It might not be a bad ...


4

I don't have an 'Android reader application' myself, but some features that I find important in my e-Reader (Sony Reader PRS-650) are: Ability to organize books into collections (or tagging could be a substitute) Dictionary (double tap a word and look it up) Ability to annotate/take notes Ability to adjust zoom level, margin cuts, font sizes. Brightness ...


3

I had similar problems since most of the (physics-related) articles I read have two columns of text and lots of equations and figures. I can recommend a free software tool called "k2pdfopt" written by William Menninger. It re-arranges the text flow of PDFs and optimizes them to the size of the e-reader screen. I'm really impressed by the results. Most ...


2

In addition to what Tom said, a few suggestions for your consideration. PDFs on e-ink readers gain greatly by being tightly cropped so you don't waste screen space. For that, the free software BRISS works very well as it selects crop areas close to the text, areas that you are free to adjust. As far as reflowing and zooming I can only speak about the Kindle ...


2

If you want to be able to read anything on a device in a direct sunlight your only choice is an ereader using electronic ink. Here is an example, outdoors on a sunny day with the sun blasting directly at the screen (try that with a tablet or your phone): From my own experience 9.7" screen size is the minimum you need to read technical literature. I tried ...


2

The Kindle DX, which uses e-ink (so it is readable in direct sunlight), was specifically designed to render PDF files in their native format (including multi-column material, tables and graphics) and was designed to be used in an academic environment. It has a 9.7" e-ink screen, which I believe is the largest of any e-reader (the Kindle Fire HD has a 7" ...


2

Print it with a good printer. I know this is not the answer you are looking for but it's still the solution that beats current technology. You can't zoom a print; I'd argue that a good print is sufficient since an scientific article should only have images that have value on A4/Letter paper.


2

You're trying to find something out of both worlds - tablets and eReaders. There are serveral devices planned to publish within the coming year. But at the moment this market looks rather abandonned. (planned devices by Sony and Onyx as far as I know) Until those devices are on the market you need to limit your requirements, as visibility and readability in ...


2

Buy an iPad or iPad mini and install Goodreader (the latest version at this time is actually called GoodReader 4, according to the previous link; it can be found here).That is the best choice.


2

In my personal opinion, pdf and e-ink do not go together well. The problem is that pdf is not really reflowable, so you must stick with the page format of the paper. Besides the suggestions already made (try Kindle DX which has a larger screen, crop as much as possible the page so that you won't waste screen estate with blank margins) try and see if it is ...


2

I don't think there is any reference style suitable for both print and ebook. Certainly footnotes look better in printed books, though I think EndNotes would be a better compromise solution for both medias. One problem with ebooks is that the semantics can be different when you are trying to come up with something resembling footnotes. In epub3 there is ...


1

Great question. First, you should be making epub3 files because generally epub3 files work on epub2 reading systems. All epub2 readers can view epub3 files -- though perhaps not optimally. My current book production method lets me show table headers across different pages, but only for printed books. So I know exactly what you're talking about. One idea ...


1

I think epub3 is basically the standard format (especially now that Kindlegen is fairly well aligned with epub3 even though kindle doesn't support all features); what you have to decide is the toolchain to get the job done (especially regard to the editing process). You also have to decide whether you are going digital only or publishing digitally and print ...


1

You didn't mention if you wanted to do this over the network or over USB. I've personally used the following approaches: The Kobo app automatically syncs directly with the Kobo device when you attach the device to a computer using a USB cable. I can copy ebooks files directly to my Kindle and/or Android phone when attached to my computer using normal drag-...


1

The Kindle DX was specifically designed to render PDF files in their native format (including multi-column material, tables and graphics) and was designed to be used in an academic environment. It has a 9.7" e-ink screen, which I believe is the largest of any e-reader (the Kindle Fire HD has a 7" screen). You can also zoom in to 200% of the original text. ...


1

EDITED TO CORRECT WRONG INFORMATION: The question is between e-ink Pearl and Carta. Here's some screenshots illustrating the difference: http://blog.the-ebook-reader.com/2013/11/11/screen-comparison-e-ink-carta-vs-e-ink-pearl/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E_Ink As I pointed out already, the improvements with each generation of e-ink were significant ...


1

Two additional things to Jason's answer: Reflowing PDF documents also could be important: Reflow Being able to rearrange the text is called reflowing the document and permits a PDF designed for a full sized piece of paper to be easily read on a small devices such as a PDA or eBook Reader. Source: http://wiki.mobileread.com/wiki/PDF#Reflow The ...


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