31

NO! Every eBook is released under a licence. Even if there is no licence specifically identified then it is covered under the general copyright law. If you purchased the book and it was not released under a licence that permits redistribution then you should assume that giving away copies to friends is forbidden. Generally you can find the licence that ...


21

Drm-Free doesn't necessarily mean copyright-free. If the book is licensed as such that it is available freely to anyone, then you are allowed to make copies. If there is some license or terms of usage attached to the book that suggests it is not free to distribute, then you are not allowed to make copies and give it away.


10

Adding some rationale to the existing answers: A common reason an author/publisher would not want you copying even a free ebook is that even "free" sales boost the book's number and visibility. An ebook the author gives away freely to 1,000 readers is better for him than giving it to 1 person who then emails it to 1,000 friends. If the book is still ...


10

Just like buying a hardcover version doesn't let you also take a paperback from the store, no, having a print version does not entitle you to a complimentary ebook version, though some publishers will offer that when you buy from their websites.


9

I am not a lawyer, but: If the text is in the public domain, then yes, you can use it. Be sure that it really is in the public domain, though—copyright lasts for a very long time. Also bear in mind that if the text is annotated, translated, or altered in any other way, or if it's a collection of public domain works, there may be further complications. If you ...


8

the only case in which you may legally copy an ebook and pass to a friend of yours is when (a) there is a "copyright" (in a broad sense of the term), and (b) the copyright says you may freely distribute the ebook (because it is in the public domain, or is published under a Creative Commons license). If there is no copyright at all, you should suppose that ...


8

I am not aware of any Amazon or other usage policy regulating the use of this file. The highlights are excerpts (quotes) from the book's content, so the copyright to those excerpts belongs to whoever owns the copyright of the content of the book. However, in most jurisdictions there are exceptions to copyright law that let you do a lot with quotes/excerpts ...


7

If it really is public domain you are free to do whatever you want*. You should keep in mind some things: The fact that it is free does not mean that it is public domain. It could also be licensed under Creative Commons or something similar. Publishing it could then be illegal under some circumstances. Examples would be omitting the license, selling a CC-...


7

That would depend on the publisher. They are not required to provide an electronic version of the book but some do it to help sell the title. Usually you can check the copyright page in some and will have the last page at the end of the book that tells you it is included. What you are asking is a selling feature of the book and some publishers even go ...


6

I can't speak for Smashwords, and this isn't legal advice, but I will say that none of the terms that you quote above seem to prohibit what you are describing. I'm actually not sure what parts concern you. They require a complete work; that doesn't mean you have to publish a complete copy of a blog's archives. They seem to be worried mostly about books ...


6

The publisher does not own the copyright unless they create the work--the author does. In traditional publishing, the author typically gives a world-wide exclusive license to use the copyright to the publisher, though many small and mid-sized presses will only ask for rights to the areas or languages they distribute in. If the publisher goes out of business ...


5

I do disagree with idiotprogrammer's answer because this question does dive into DRM which plays a large part in ebooks. You could try changing the authorization of your Adobe Digital Editions account, reference: "How do I change the authorization on my laptop" with a re-install. If that doesn't work you would need to contact ebooks.com. Since you're ...


5

Since this issue will be important to this group, I found a couple of resources that will explain copyright terms in different countries. The data on the first site hasn't been updated in a while but it does include info on fair use. Foreign Copyright Laws Tree-view chart on Foreign Copyright Law The good thing about the above site is that it is ...


5

To get permission, you need to contact the rights-holder. Unless it is unequivocally licensed for reuse by the original rights holder or in the public domain, you can't just use it. Note that just using Google image search to find images marked for reuse is not sufficient—anyone can post images to the web, and frequently people post images they don't ...


5

If you want to digitize it yourself, you absolutely can under the First Sale Doctrine, provided that you own the copy of the books. I digitize books, so this actually wouldn't be daunting. At this point, however, I haven't started digitizing personal books yet. Yet. I use free, open source tools to process ebooks from digitized books: Homer (sorts pages and ...


5

The short answer is that any website offering permanent access to large numbers of copyrighted books, for very little money, from multiple publishers is unlikely to be legitimate. HumbleBundle offers its bundles for limited time. Book Barbarian, ManyBooks, BookBub, Luzme, and no doubt many others, search the web on your behalf and find books that are ...


4

That depends. In copyright law of practically every country in the world, a book automatically falls under copyright, even if no license information is present. The right to copy is exclusively granted to the author, with a few exceptions such as the right to cite and in some countries the right to fair use. The rights on a book don't have to belong to the ...


3

So, I am not a lawyer, etc. The basics of copyright law, though, are fairly straightforward: If you don't own the image/text/song/whatever, you can't use it, unless there's an explicit license in place that lets you do what you want to do. There are some specific exceptions in place, like parody (which is about creating transformative work from pre-existing ...


3

This answer does not present any legal advice. In fact your post contains two questions. Speaking of the youtube license part you should definetly add information about the country you want to publish the eBook. CC licenses come with different characteristics, regulating the rights and responsibilities. The use of CC licensed images may be limited in terms ...


3

Both existing answers are mostly correct. To expand a little: Copyright laws vary by country. For example, Wikisource contains works that are considered public domain by United States law. BUT that site also carries works that are published under Creative Commons licenses. Then there is Wikilivres, which contains works that are public domain in Canada ...


3

You need to check the "copyright" or the "terms of use" documentation provided by the platform you obtained the free ebook. Example from Google Play Terms of Service: 6. Rights and Restrictions License to Use Products. Following payment of the applicable fees for a Product, you will have the non-exclusive right, for the period selected by you ...


2

One ebook publisher, O'Reilly, explicitly states their rules in their terms and conditions, which are very different to the Google terms quoted above; which goes to prove that the answer to the original question depends on the terms under which you obtained the book. http://shop.oreilly.com/category/customer-service/ebooks.do You can legally lend, resell ...


2

Yes, this is okay, as of October 5, 2013. (I'm a developer at Smashwords.) From the Site Updates page: "Charles Dickens is smiling. We updated our Terms of Service yesterday to allow short serials. We had already relaxed the prior prohibition quite a bit over the last year, because we never felt comfortable making subjective judgements between what was ...


2

I think some of the larger photo licensing services charge a lot of money for book publishing -- they lump print and ebook together. It's in your best interest to be flexible about which exact photos you need and not have your heart set on a single photograph. There's lots of great photography out there waiting to be discovered which can be had for a dime. ...


2

As with so many things in life you cannot be 100% sure. That is somewhat more true for digital distribution, as there is no way to check e.g. that a company bought paper for 1000 books and said it only printed and sold half of that. Unless the DIY publishing company is really small, there will be multiple people involved in faking such sales (the person ...


2

This guide is quite useful from Univ. of Pennsilvania. Copyright Watch is also helpful, but the information isn't so direct. You have to really dig through legal documents.


2

An e-book is basically made of 2 things, that both have copyrights associated: The content of the book The edition of the book The former is the work of the author to write the text. The latter is the work of the editor to turn the text into a presentable file. A paper book is the same thing, plus a physical support, which have an intrinsic value due to ...


2

No. And since an answer requires 30 characters, no again.


1

Let me say that I have no idea what the answer to your question is. So what follows is my best guess based on a hunch. First, it's ridiculous to think that a DRMed ebook is tied to an email. Instead, it is tied to a user account created for a specific vendor. Every website under the sun allows you to change the email for the account. Even if the sign on ...


1

I definitely feel your pain. As a technical writer I've usually signed NDAs about things I've worked on, but I also need to show samples for potential employees. I think everybody would be fine with doing a screenshot of a single page (or back to back pages) to show off formatting. After all, most of the time, consumers can see these limited samples on ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible