4 added 338 characters in body
source | link

Yes. You can write. I am writing oneHere are my experiences.  

MS Word approach

  1. When you finish your Google doc, I eportedexported the manuscript as .DOCX. This format worked best for me. I faced serious problems with .epub and .pdf formats.
  2. Caveat - If you have used Google doc specific embedded drawings then they are likely to get clipped. I had to convert them to pictures using Windows sniping tool and embed them back as an image
  3. Caveat - I had lots of problems with equations. They would not align well with oridinary text or with bullets. Some of the Equation toolbar symbols like the summation did not show up at all. I had to use the "insert symbol" approach
  4. Caveat - Table column widths appeared different on Kindle

Challenges with HTMLHTML approach You

You can also save your Google Doc content as a HTML file. This will come down as a ZIP with 1 HTML and a subfolder with all the images. But there were serious challenges. 

  1. Font Size - The font sizes were too large when viewed on Kindle

  2. HTML errors - Kindle Previewer 3 would frequently complain that there were errors in the HTML. I had to un-minify the HTML and then run Kindle Previewer again. Go back to the offending line number. There were many empty IMG tags and I had to remove all of them

  3. Font units - I had to change the font units from pt to em for much improved rendition on Kindle

  4. Equations - If your manuscript has mathematical equations then these will be converted to static pictures.

  5. Further reference -

  1. HTML errors - Kindle Previewer 3 would frequently complain that there were errors in the HTML. I had to un-minify the HTML and then run Kindle Previewer again. Go back to the offending line number. There were many empty IMG tags and I had to remove all of them

  2. Font units - The font sizes were too large when viewed on Kindle. I had to change the font units from pt to em for much improved rendition on Kindle

  3. Equations - If your manuscript has mathematical equations then these will be converted to static pictures.

  4. Table of contents - The table of contents that was generated inside Google Docs would not work nicely on Kindle. Clicking on the ToC would take me to unpredictable locations in the book. I have no explanation for this.

  5. Further reference -

Summary Yes you can definitely use Google Docs for authoring Kindle content. You can use MS Word or HTML. You should try out a short sample before progressing too far down the road. However, in my case, I am almost near toon the verge of abandoning GD in favour of a tool like Scrivener, which I believe is more suited for such an endeavour.

Yes. You can write. I am writing one.  

  1. When you finish your Google doc, I eported the manuscript as .DOCX. This format worked best for me. I faced serious problems with .epub and .pdf formats.
  2. Caveat - If you have used Google doc specific embedded drawings then they are likely to get clipped. I had to convert them to pictures using Windows sniping tool and embed them back as an image
  3. Caveat - I had lots of problems with equations. They would not align well with oridinary text or with bullets. Some of the Equation toolbar symbols like the summation did not show up at all. I had to use the "insert symbol" approach
  4. Caveat - Table column widths appeared different on Kindle

Challenges with HTML approach You can also save your Google Doc content as a HTML file. This will come down as a ZIP with 1 HTML and a subfolder with all the images.

  1. Font Size - The font sizes were too large when viewed on Kindle

  2. HTML errors - Kindle Previewer 3 would frequently complain that there were errors in the HTML. I had to un-minify the HTML and then run Kindle Previewer again. Go back to the offending line number. There were many empty IMG tags and I had to remove all of them

  3. Font units - I had to change the font units from pt to em for much improved rendition on Kindle

  4. Equations - If your manuscript has mathematical equations then these will be converted to static pictures.

  5. Further reference -

Summary Yes you can definitely use Google Docs for authoring Kindle content. However, in my case, I am almost near to abandoning GD in favour of a tool like Scrivener, which I believe is more suited for such an endeavour.

Yes. You can write. Here are my experiences.

MS Word approach

  1. I exported the manuscript as .DOCX. This format worked best for me. I faced serious problems with .epub and .pdf formats.
  2. Caveat - If you have used Google doc specific embedded drawings then they are likely to get clipped. I had to convert them to pictures using Windows sniping tool and embed them back as an image
  3. Caveat - I had lots of problems with equations. They would not align well with oridinary text or with bullets. Some of the Equation toolbar symbols like the summation did not show up at all. I had to use the "insert symbol" approach
  4. Caveat - Table column widths appeared different on Kindle

HTML approach

You can also save your Google Doc content as a HTML file. This will come down as a ZIP with 1 HTML and a subfolder with all the images. But there were serious challenges. 

  1. HTML errors - Kindle Previewer 3 would frequently complain that there were errors in the HTML. I had to un-minify the HTML and then run Kindle Previewer again. Go back to the offending line number. There were many empty IMG tags and I had to remove all of them

  2. Font units - The font sizes were too large when viewed on Kindle. I had to change the font units from pt to em for much improved rendition on Kindle

  3. Equations - If your manuscript has mathematical equations then these will be converted to static pictures.

  4. Table of contents - The table of contents that was generated inside Google Docs would not work nicely on Kindle. Clicking on the ToC would take me to unpredictable locations in the book. I have no explanation for this.

  5. Further reference -

Summary Yes you can definitely use Google Docs for authoring Kindle content. You can use MS Word or HTML. You should try out a short sample before progressing too far down the road. However, in my case, I am almost on the verge of abandoning GD in favour of a tool like Scrivener, which I believe is more suited for such an endeavour.

3 Added some more points based on my experiences. Hope this helps
source | link

Yes. You can write. I am writing one.

  1. When you finish your Google doc, you must exportI eported the manuscript as .DOCX. This format worked best for me. I faced serious problems with .epub and .pdf formats.
  2. Caveat - If you have used Google doc specific embedded drawings then they are likely to get clipped. I had to convert them to pictures using Windows sniping tool and embed them back as an image
  3. Caveat - I had lots of problems with equations. They would not align well with oridinary text or with bullets. Some of the Equation toolbar symbols like the summation did not show up at all. I had to use the "insert symbol" approach
  4. Caveat - Table column widths appeared different on Kindle

Overall suggestion using MS Word - write a couple of pages on GD which captures some of your complex formatting scenarios, export to DOCX and preview the file on Kindle previewer (online) . I would recommend doing this upfront so that you can learn lessons

Challenges with HTML approach You can also save your Google Doc content as a HTML file. This will come down as a ZIP with 1 HTML and a subfolder with all the images.

  1. Font Size - The font sizes were too large when viewed on Kindle

  2. HTML errors - Kindle Previewer 3 would frequently complain that there were errors in the HTML. I had to un-minify the HTML and then run Kindle Previewer again. Go back to the offending line number. There were many empty IMG tags and I had to remove all of them

  3. Font units - I had to change the font units from pt to em for much improved rendition on Kindle

  4. Equations - If your manuscript has mathematical equations then these will be converted to static pictures.

  5. Further reference -

https://medium.com/@perrygarvin/how-to-make-an-amazon-kindle-book-using-html-and-css-146070ba0d7e

https://daveparsonsnz.wordpress.com/2015/02/26/converting-a-google-doc-to-a-kindle-format-mobi-file/

Summary Yes you can definitely use Google Docs for authoring Kindle content. However, in my case, I am almost near to abandoning GD in favour of a tool like Scrivener, which I believe is more suited for such an endeavour.

Hope this helps.

Yes. You can write. I am writing one.

  1. When you finish your Google doc, you must export the manuscript as .DOCX. This format worked best for me. I faced serious problems with .epub and .pdf formats.
  2. Caveat - If you have used Google doc specific embedded drawings then they are likely to get clipped. I had to convert them to pictures using Windows sniping tool and embed them back as an image
  3. Caveat - I had lots of problems with equations. They would not align well with oridinary text or with bullets. Some of the Equation toolbar symbols like the summation did not show up at all. I had to use the "insert symbol" approach
  4. Caveat - Table column widths appeared different on Kindle

Overall suggestion - write a couple of pages on GD which captures some of your complex formatting scenarios, export to DOCX and preview the file on Kindle previewer (online) . I would recommend doing this upfront so that you can learn lessons

Yes. You can write. I am writing one.

  1. When you finish your Google doc, I eported the manuscript as .DOCX. This format worked best for me. I faced serious problems with .epub and .pdf formats.
  2. Caveat - If you have used Google doc specific embedded drawings then they are likely to get clipped. I had to convert them to pictures using Windows sniping tool and embed them back as an image
  3. Caveat - I had lots of problems with equations. They would not align well with oridinary text or with bullets. Some of the Equation toolbar symbols like the summation did not show up at all. I had to use the "insert symbol" approach
  4. Caveat - Table column widths appeared different on Kindle

Overall suggestion using MS Word - write a couple of pages on GD which captures some of your complex formatting scenarios, export to DOCX and preview the file on Kindle previewer (online) . I would recommend doing this upfront so that you can learn lessons

Challenges with HTML approach You can also save your Google Doc content as a HTML file. This will come down as a ZIP with 1 HTML and a subfolder with all the images.

  1. Font Size - The font sizes were too large when viewed on Kindle

  2. HTML errors - Kindle Previewer 3 would frequently complain that there were errors in the HTML. I had to un-minify the HTML and then run Kindle Previewer again. Go back to the offending line number. There were many empty IMG tags and I had to remove all of them

  3. Font units - I had to change the font units from pt to em for much improved rendition on Kindle

  4. Equations - If your manuscript has mathematical equations then these will be converted to static pictures.

  5. Further reference -

https://medium.com/@perrygarvin/how-to-make-an-amazon-kindle-book-using-html-and-css-146070ba0d7e

https://daveparsonsnz.wordpress.com/2015/02/26/converting-a-google-doc-to-a-kindle-format-mobi-file/

Summary Yes you can definitely use Google Docs for authoring Kindle content. However, in my case, I am almost near to abandoning GD in favour of a tool like Scrivener, which I believe is more suited for such an endeavour.

Hope this helps.

2 Some corrections.
source | link

Yes youYes. You can write. I am writing one.

  1. When you finish your Google doc, you must export the manuscript as .DOCX. This format worked best for me. I faced serious problems with .epub and .pdf formats.
  2. CaveatCaveat - If you have used Google doc specific embedded drawings then they are likely to get clipped. I had to convert them to pictures using Windows sniping tool and embed them back as an image
  3. CaveatCaveat - I had lots of problems with equations. They would not align well with oridinary text or with bullets. Some of the Equation toolbar symbols like the summation did not show up at all. I had to use the "insert symbol" approach
  4. Caveat - Table column widths appeared different on Kindle

Overall suggestionOverall suggestion - write a couple of pages on GD which captures some of your complex formatting scenarios, export to DOCX and preview the file on Kindle previewer (online) . I would recommend doing this upfront so that you can learn lessons

Yes you can write. I am writing one.

  1. When you finish your Google doc, you must export the manuscript as .DOCX. This format worked best for me
  2. Caveat - If you have used Google doc specific embedded drawings then they are likely to get clipped. I had to convert them to pictures using Windows sniping tool and embed them back as an image
  3. Caveat - I had lots of problems with equations. They would not align well with oridinary text or with bullets. Some of the Equation toolbar symbols like the summation did not show up at all. I had to use the "insert symbol" approach

Overall suggestion - write a couple of pages on GD , export to DOCX and preview the file on Kindle previewer (online) . I would recommend doing this upfront so that you can learn lessons

Yes. You can write. I am writing one.

  1. When you finish your Google doc, you must export the manuscript as .DOCX. This format worked best for me. I faced serious problems with .epub and .pdf formats.
  2. Caveat - If you have used Google doc specific embedded drawings then they are likely to get clipped. I had to convert them to pictures using Windows sniping tool and embed them back as an image
  3. Caveat - I had lots of problems with equations. They would not align well with oridinary text or with bullets. Some of the Equation toolbar symbols like the summation did not show up at all. I had to use the "insert symbol" approach
  4. Caveat - Table column widths appeared different on Kindle

Overall suggestion - write a couple of pages on GD which captures some of your complex formatting scenarios, export to DOCX and preview the file on Kindle previewer (online) . I would recommend doing this upfront so that you can learn lessons

1
source | link