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Do prices tend to increase, decrease, or stay the same during the holiday season (i.e. Christmas, Hanukkah, etc.)?

From my experience, book prices tend to be reduced around the holiday season, September-January, to drive sellssales when some people buy tablets or mobile devices as gifts or even on Black Friday. Depending on the e-retailer there are some programs you can sign-up for that will help drive a sell, such as package deals. I've seen some publishers drive prices lower than usual when they have a feature series they are trying to push.

Is there a most expensive season for book prices?

I wouldn't consider it a "most expensive" I would look at it as less discounts or specials in the transition from spring to summer but that's my experience.

Do eBook prices have different trends than paperback book prices?

The only trend I would consider is the pricing model with printbookprinted books VS ebooks. Some people think that its okit's OK to price retail for print when some people refuse to pay the same price for a physical item compared to a digital copy. One of my dis-likesdislikes with ebooks compared to print is the design around them. Some people think that as long as I take my well designed print book and copy all the text and drop it into a .doc file I can generate an .epub or .mobi file out of it then charge a bloated fee when you dontdon't get the same quality as a printed or even own the rights to it.

For geographical context, this question is about books sales in the northeastern areas of the United States. I mostly shop for books at Barnes & Noble, so I'd be most interested to know how their prices fluctuate.

In regards to pricing e-retailer VS e-retailer you actually sign away your pricing rights, such as: Amazon mentions in their contract that if they find a cheaper price for your title they are allowed up to a 10% option for less and I believe Apple does it, too. The downfall with many stores is the gouge to sell your title and that will play a factor on where you buy your book and the price.

Do prices tend to increase, decrease, or stay the same during the holiday season (i.e. Christmas, Hanukkah, etc.)?

From my experience, book prices tend to be reduced around the holiday season, September-January, to drive sells when some people buy tablets or mobile devices as gifts or even on Black Friday. Depending on the e-retailer there are some programs you can sign-up for that will help drive a sell, such as package deals. I've seen some publishers drive prices lower than usual when they have a feature series they are trying to push.

Is there a most expensive season for book prices?

I wouldn't consider it a "most expensive" I would look at it as less discounts or specials in the transition from spring to summer but that's my experience.

Do eBook prices have different trends than paperback book prices?

The only trend I would consider is the pricing model with printbook VS ebooks. Some people think that its ok to price retail for print when some people refuse to pay the same price for a physical item compared to a digital copy. One of my dis-likes with ebooks compared to print is the design around them. Some people think that as long as I take my well designed print book and copy all the text and drop it into a .doc file I can generate an .epub or .mobi file out of it then charge a bloated fee when you dont get the same quality as a printed or even own the rights to it.

For geographical context, this question is about books sales in the northeastern areas of the United States. I mostly shop for books at Barnes & Noble, so I'd be most interested to know how their prices fluctuate.

In regards to pricing e-retailer VS e-retailer you actually sign away your pricing rights, such as: Amazon mentions in their contract that if they find a cheaper price for your title they are allowed up to a 10% option for less and I believe Apple does it, too. The downfall with many stores is the gouge to sell your title and that will play a factor on where you buy your book and the price.

Do prices tend to increase, decrease, or stay the same during the holiday season (i.e. Christmas, Hanukkah, etc.)?

From my experience, book prices tend to be reduced around the holiday season, September-January, to drive sales when some people buy tablets or mobile devices as gifts or even on Black Friday. Depending on the e-retailer there are some programs you can sign-up for that will help drive a sell, such as package deals. I've seen some publishers drive prices lower than usual when they have a feature series they are trying to push.

Is there a most expensive season for book prices?

I wouldn't consider it a "most expensive" I would look at it as less discounts or specials in the transition from spring to summer but that's my experience.

Do eBook prices have different trends than paperback book prices?

The only trend I would consider is the pricing model with printed books VS ebooks. Some people think that it's OK to price retail for print when some people refuse to pay the same price for a physical item compared to a digital copy. One of my dislikes with ebooks compared to print is the design around them. Some people think that as long as I take my well designed print book and copy all the text and drop it into a .doc file I can generate an .epub or .mobi file out of it then charge a bloated fee when you don't get the same quality as a printed or even own the rights to it.

For geographical context, this question is about books sales in the northeastern areas of the United States. I mostly shop for books at Barnes & Noble, so I'd be most interested to know how their prices fluctuate.

In regards to pricing e-retailer VS e-retailer you actually sign away your pricing rights, such as: Amazon mentions in their contract that if they find a cheaper price for your title they are allowed up to a 10% option for less and I believe Apple does it, too. The downfall with many stores is the gouge to sell your title and that will play a factor on where you buy your book and the price.

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Do prices tend to increase, decrease, or stay the same during the holiday season (i.e. Christmas, Hanukkah, etc.)?

From my experience, book prices tend to be reduced around the holiday season, September-January, to drive sells when some people buy tablets or mobile devices as gifts or even on Black Friday. Depending on the e-retailer there are some programs you can sign-up for that will help drive a sell, such as package deals. I've seen some publishers drive prices lower than usual when they have a feature series they are trying to push.

Is there a most expensive season for book prices?

I wouldn't consider it a "most expensive" I would look at it as less discounts or specials in the transition from spring to summer but that's my experience.

Do eBook prices have different trends than paperback book prices?

The only trend I would consider is the pricing model with printbook VS ebooks. Some people think that its ok to price retail for print when some people refuse to pay the same price for a physical item compared to a digital copy. One of my dis-likes with ebooks compared to print is the design around them. Some people think that as long as I take my well designed print book and copy all the text and drop it into a .doc file I can generate an .epub or.mobi` or .mobi file out of it then charge a bloated fee when you dont get the same quality as a printed or even own the rights to it.

For geographical context, this question is about books sales in the northeastern areas of the United States. I mostly shop for books at Barnes & Noble, so I'd be most interested to know how their prices fluctuate.

In regards to pricing e-retailer VS e-retailer you actually sign away your pricing rights, such as: Amazon mentions in their contract that if they find a cheaper price for your title they are allowed up to a 10% option for less and I believe Apple does it, too. The downfall with many stores is the gouge to sell your title and that will play a factor on where you buy your book and the price.

Do prices tend to increase, decrease, or stay the same during the holiday season (i.e. Christmas, Hanukkah, etc.)?

From my experience, book prices tend to be reduced around the holiday season, September-January, to drive sells when some people buy tablets or mobile devices as gifts.

Is there a most expensive season for book prices?

I wouldn't consider it a "most expensive" I would look at it as less discounts or specials in the transition from spring to summer but that's my experience.

Do eBook prices have different trends than paperback book prices?

The only trend I would consider is the pricing model with printbook VS ebooks. Some people think that its ok to price retail for print when some people refuse to pay the same price for a physical item compared to a digital copy. One of my dis-likes with ebooks compared to print is the design around them. Some people think that as long as I take my well designed print book and copy all the text and drop it into a .doc file I can generate an .epub or.mobi` file out of it then charge a bloated fee when you dont get the same quality as a printed.

For geographical context, this question is about books sales in the northeastern areas of the United States. I mostly shop for books at Barnes & Noble, so I'd be most interested to know how their prices fluctuate.

In regards to pricing e-retailer VS e-retailer you actually sign away your pricing rights, such as: Amazon mentions in their contract that if they find a cheaper price for your title they are allowed up to a 10% option for less and I believe Apple does it, too. The downfall with many stores is the gouge to sell your title and that will play a factor on where you buy your book and the price.

Do prices tend to increase, decrease, or stay the same during the holiday season (i.e. Christmas, Hanukkah, etc.)?

From my experience, book prices tend to be reduced around the holiday season, September-January, to drive sells when some people buy tablets or mobile devices as gifts or even on Black Friday. Depending on the e-retailer there are some programs you can sign-up for that will help drive a sell, such as package deals. I've seen some publishers drive prices lower than usual when they have a feature series they are trying to push.

Is there a most expensive season for book prices?

I wouldn't consider it a "most expensive" I would look at it as less discounts or specials in the transition from spring to summer but that's my experience.

Do eBook prices have different trends than paperback book prices?

The only trend I would consider is the pricing model with printbook VS ebooks. Some people think that its ok to price retail for print when some people refuse to pay the same price for a physical item compared to a digital copy. One of my dis-likes with ebooks compared to print is the design around them. Some people think that as long as I take my well designed print book and copy all the text and drop it into a .doc file I can generate an .epub or .mobi file out of it then charge a bloated fee when you dont get the same quality as a printed or even own the rights to it.

For geographical context, this question is about books sales in the northeastern areas of the United States. I mostly shop for books at Barnes & Noble, so I'd be most interested to know how their prices fluctuate.

In regards to pricing e-retailer VS e-retailer you actually sign away your pricing rights, such as: Amazon mentions in their contract that if they find a cheaper price for your title they are allowed up to a 10% option for less and I believe Apple does it, too. The downfall with many stores is the gouge to sell your title and that will play a factor on where you buy your book and the price.

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source | link

Do prices tend to increase, decrease, or stay the same during the holiday season (i.e. Christmas, Hanukkah, etc.)?

From my experience, book prices tend to be reduced around the holiday season, September-January, to drive sells when some people buy tablets or mobile devices as gifts.

Is there a most expensive season for book prices?

I wouldn't consider it a "most expensive" I would look at it as less discounts or specials in the transition from spring to summer but that's my experience.

Do eBook prices have different trends than paperback book prices?

The only trend I would consider is the pricing model with printbook VS ebooks. Some people think that its ok to price retail for print when some people refuse to pay the same price for a physical item compared to a digital copy. One of my dis-likes with ebooks compared to print is the design around them. Some people think that as long as I take my well designed print book and copy all the text and drop it into a .doc file I can generate an .epub or.mobi` file out of it then charge a bloated fee when you dont get the same quality as a printed.

For geographical context, this question is about books sales in the northeastern areas of the United States. I mostly shop for books at Barnes & Noble, so I'd be most interested to know how their prices fluctuate.

In regards to pricing e-retailer VS e-retailer you actually sign away your pricing rights, such as: Amazon mentions in their contract that if they find a cheaper price for your title they are allowed up to a 10% option for less and I believe Apple does it, too. The downfall with many stores is the gouge to sell your title and that will play a factor on where you buy your book and the price.